The BIG contradiction in Customer Experience

Michele Paselli

by Michele Paselli

April 15, 2015

Since starting Satsum, me and my co-founder Andy have developed a rather peculiar habit. Every time we get a customer feedback survey we open it, we take screenshots, and we store them in our Dropbox. We have two different folders, one folder for the feedback forms we would like to reply ourselves, and one folder for the typical “OMG another feedback form”.

customer_experience_feedback_form

After about a year the good feedback forms folder is still almost empty

Customer experience is everywhere, yet we see very few attempts in the market to change these bad design practices in feedback forms. No matter how cool the company is (and I’m talking about Apple, Virgin, Soundcloud here) and how much obsession they usually put in their marketing efforts, the results is still the same. Micro checkboxes only snipers can click, Windows 95 drop-downs, and fear when you try to open it on mobile.

My question is why? Isn’t it super clear to everyone that consumers have evolved their expectations since Internet 1992? So why do all feedback forms still look like back then?

It’s a mystery we haven’t unveiled yet, but we’re working to change this. We think that this has actually a deeper meaning. As CX management software vendors, we preach all day about the need of being customer centric, so obviously we have to be customer centric ourselves or we’ll lose credibility. Well, my claim here is that we should not only being centric towards our clients, but also towards our clients’ customers. And Janet or Tom would surely love to be asked for feedback in the same quick and slick way they were asked to purchase.

No more bad feedback forms please.

P.S. wanna see who’s in the good feedback form? Sign up to our blog with the form below, we’ll reveal it next time!

P.P.S. Thanks to David Mitzenmacher (and his awesome blog) I just found out that the great Rob Markey has the same habit we have!

Michele Paselli

About 

Co-founder @ Satsum. Helping companies get customer love.